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Tom Hunter appropriates an aesthetic language of the nineteenth century, while revealing lives of squatters in the twentieth. The British artist has mastered a use of light in creating alluring visual tableaux. You can see Vermeer and the Pre-Raphaelites in the colors and light which inform these idyllic scenes. Hunter creates mythical scenes from the English social landscape which seem at once familiar and disturbing.

Tom Hunter @ Yancey Richardson Galle
thru november 29
www.yanceyrichardson.com


The production value of Christian Lemmerz’s sculptures is one of the first elements, which attracts the eye upon entering his room. The glassine quality of the polished white marble is such a classical device. Then you notice more detail: in “Undead”, the decapitated marmoreal body of a Greek god is coupled with John the Baptist’s severed head that apparently is offering fellatio. Upon closer inspection, we see that the head is actually that of Michael Jackson. “Son of Jesus”, a milky, crystalline figure of a baby boy lies softly on a low plinth, sporting the requisite stigmata. Finally,“Rio Kid” seems to be sucking his bronze thumb underneath his shirt while in fact he actually has his face buried in a bag of glue.

Christian Lemmerz @ DCA Gallery
thru november 30
www.dcagallery.com

- Aude de Bourbon [Monday, November 24th, 2003]

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